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Installation view
KATHERINE DERELI
20/06/19 - 30/06/19
OUTPUT gallery is excited to present work by Katherine Dereli in our first exhibition to exclusively show paintings. In the past, visitors to OUTPUT have requested more painting exhibitions so we reached out to the artist because she demonstrates a strong painting practice that we feel many could engage with. The artist originally studied Fine Art, then trained and worked in 3D modelling and visualisation, before returning to her art practice. She now makes painting, sculpture, ceramics and drawings. For this exhibition, Dereli presents a selection of paintings that were mostly produced through the #paintingaday challenge the artist has been keeping up with online.

Dereli’s approach to painting is informed by her background in drawing as a way to understand structure, which goes on to influence how she sculpts too. The artist paints from life rather than photographs because, she writes, ’I want someone looking at what I do to be closer to the raw perception. I want what I work on to be more like how things look to me than how photographs of things look.’ She aims to create artwork that is loaded with her own subjective experience but also gives enough space for the viewer to make their own connection with the subject.
Installation view
Painting by Katherine Dereli
What do you think about our local art scene?

It’s a very difficult era for arts in our country. A lot of the funding has left the regions and been consolidated in national institutions in London. My impression is that for historical reasons the large scale institutions in Liverpool haven't always been terribly effective in helping homegrown talent and artist led institutions such as the Independents Biennial have been a bit fractious. On the other hand in recent years it does seem like the scattered practitioners of Liverpool have congealed into a genuine arts scene with spaces like OUTPUT helping to bring this about.

How do you feel about putting your art on Instagram?

I'm old enough that I am in no way a 'digital native' and my artistic practice is largely about putting globs of physical, not digital, material together in interesting ways; as a result my engagement with Instagram is superficial at best. I'm part of a large contingent of people engaging with technology in a fairly non-standard and utilitarian way. I certainly use it differently from the core of important influencers and content creators whose activity is promoted as aspirational and given a privileged status because of the social dynamics of the system and the demands of capital. Making art can be a solitary activity so probably the most valuable thing that Instagram provides me as an artist is the illusion of working in public. The small number of personal contacts and artists who do see my work (and vice versa) are also wonderfully helpful.

What has #paintingaday done for your practice?

Painting a day is a well worn way of improving your work and giving your day structure. The technology mediated version of it seems to be good for getting feedback and engaging with global networks, seeing other people doing the thing you do and being seen by them, but also it places a tech company in the middle of interactions in a sort of odd way which is a BAD THING on a macro level. It fits rather nicely as a longer form activity into the ecosystem of timed challenges which have utility in driving social media engagement and, at least in the art community, fostering improvement through creative endeavor eg. #inktober. In terms of the actual practice I am very happy with the way I've been able to build up a body of quick sketches often no longer than a few hours long. It produces a number of duds along the way but also some paintings that work surprisingly well as finished pieces as well as providing ideas for large pieces.
Painting by Katherine Dereli
Painting by Katherine Dereli
Painting by Katherine Dereli
Painting by Katherine Dereli
Painting by Katherine Dereli
Painting by Katherine Dereli